clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Champ Bailey: Toughest WR to Cover was Marvin Harrison

New, comments

Saints cornerback Champ Bailey said this week on Mike and Mike in the Morning that Marvin Harrison was the receiver who has given him the most problems in his NFL career.

Matthew Emmons-US PRESSWIRE

This got buried a bit in minicamp news this past week, but now that we're past that and officially into the slowest part of the NFL offseason, it's worth going back a bit to note.  Saints cornerback Champ Bailey appeared on ESPN Radio's Mike and Mike in the Morning this past week and had some interesting comments.  Now, consider that Bailey is undoubtedly one of the greatest corners in NFL history.  He has made 12 Pro Bowls in his career and has been named to 7 All-Pro teams.  He has picked off 52 career passes and was named to the NFL All-Decade-Team of the 2000s.

Of course, with Bailey moving from playing with Peyton Manning and the Broncos the past two years to now playing with Drew Brees and the Saints, Bailey was asked the question of which quarterback was better, and he declined to answer that - which makes perfect sense.

Bailey was later asked, however, who the toughest wide receiver he ever had to cover was.  Bailey thought about it for a moment, and then answered:

"A lot has to do with the quarterback, so I'm gonna think about the guy who gave me the most problems, because I played him a lot, was Marvin Harrsion.  He was dangerous, and then he had a dangerous arm throwing him the ball, so it was tough both ways. He's definitely up there.... It's a lot about the guy throwing him the ball as well, but he was quick, fast, I mean, he could do it all."

Harrison is one of the greatest wide receivers to play the game and was one of the most dangerous receivers in the league for many, many years.  He caught 1,102 career passes for 14,580 yards and 128 touchdowns in 190 career games.  Harrison and quarterback Peyton Manning were deadly together, setting numerous NFL records for quarterback and wide receiver duos.