clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

Colts Prospect Interviews: Akron Cornerback Kyron Brown

New, comments

Akron Cornerback Kyron Brown could be a perfect fit in the later rounds for the Colts.

NCAA Football: Boca Raton Bowl-Florida Atlantic vs Akron Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports

Our next prospect interview is with Akron Cornerback Kyron Brown. Brown is a 6’1” 195 pound corner who plays with great physicality and strength.

Career Stats: 127 total tackles, 5 tackles for a loss, 21 pass deflections, 6 interceptions, and 1 forced fumble.

Brown interviewed exclusively with Stampede Blue to talk about his college recruitment, his cornerback technique, and how he will translate to the NFL.


ZH: How did you end up playing football at Akron University?

KB: So I was originally recruited by Terrell Buckley, he was the cornerbacks coach at Akron at the time, but then he took a job at Louisville. They were trying to get me to come out and walk-on there but I didn’t want to do that. So I was waiting to find out who the new CB coach would be at Akron and when I met him (Coach Otis Mounds), it turned out that he had played Arena Football with my dad so he knew my mom and everything already and it just worked out that way. I stayed with Akron.


ZH: The decision seemed to be a good one as you received many awards at Akron. You were given the Captain’s Award and Iron ZIP Award in 2018, the Harry “Doc” Smith Award in 2017, and the Rise and Shine Award in 2014. What does it mean to you to be honored by your coaches and teammates so many times?

KB: It was truly a blessing man. It was just a testament to all the work I put in at Akron and just having my coaches and my teammates vote for those awards for me was an unbelievable feeling.


ZH: Off the topic of football, you have a Bachelors degree in Criminal Justice/ Political Science and are pursuing a Masters, is that something that you would like to go into after your football career?

KB: I was always a big fan of shows like First 48, CSI, Criminal Minds, things like that so when I went to school I said that is something that I want to learn more about. I definitely think after my football career, I would love to do something in criminal justice. I also think that we need more African Americans in that field so that is definitely something that I want to do after football.


ZH: That’s awesome man. Switching back to football, you played in the NFLPA Bowl not too long ago. What was that experience like?

KB: Wonderful experience man. Just learning the business of the NFL, they had a lot of NFL personnel come speak with us. The coaches were great, I got coached by Hall of Famer Darrell Green and he taught me a lot of things to take my game to the next level so all in all it was a wonderful experience and I’m glad I got the opportunity to do that.


ZH: The first thing that stands out to me on your tape is your tackling and physicality, do you pride yourself in being strong in those two areas?

KB: Yeah I definitely pride myself in being physical as a corner. I’m bigger than a lot of corners so that is something that I use to my advantage. My physicality, my long arms, just knowing what makes your game different from the rest is always an advantage so I like being physical a lot.


ZH: Seems to me that the traits you excel best in could best suite a transition to safety in the NFL. Would you be open to moving to safety in the NFL or would you rather stay at corner?

KB: I would love to stay at corner but I’m willing to do whatever it takes to help whichever team gives me the opportunity. If that means me being more of a safety then I’m definitely willing to do that. Whatever helps the team win.


ZH: You played a lot of special teams at Akron, do you think that you can step right in and contribute as a special teamer in the NFL?

KB: Yes definitely, I’ve played special teams my whole life so it’s kind of second nature to me man. I’d definitely love to play special teams in the NFL. I know how important it is and how it can change games so I take pride in playing special teams. I know a lot of starters don’t like special teams but going into the NFL, you aren’t going to be the starter right away so I would definitely love playing special teams when I get there.


ZH: Now this is more of a personal question, as I love cornerback technique, but which press technique do you prefer; mirror and match or step-kick?

KB: I learned step-kick at Akron so I’m pretty comfortable with that one but I think I’m a very fast learner so I think I’m able to do both. I would prefer step-kick though.


ZH: What is your best trait going into the NFL?

KB: I would say my length, my length is definitely something I use to my advantage when getting my hands on receivers. The thing that you don’t really see on film is my football IQ so I really think that is one of my better qualities. Just from playing so much, I got a lot of reps in college like almost every game after I redshirted, so from my experience and just learning the game over the years I’d say my IQ is a strength.


ZH: Who in the NFL do you model your game after most?

KB: Patrick Peterson definitely, he’s one of the greatest to do it. Richard Sherman, I actually got to speak with him at the NFLPA Bowl and picked his brain a lot. Those are two of my favorite corners.


ZH: Corners are typically a very cocky, loud breed of football player. Would you classify yourself as that type of corner?

KB: (Laughs) Uhh I wouldn’t say... I have my moments, I’m not going to lie, depending on the type of receiver I’m going against or how the game is going. I tend to sit back and let my play do the talking for me but there are definitely times where I’ll get in your face and show my cocky side for sure.


ZH: Final question for you, in this cornerback class, why should my team spend a draft pick on Kyron Brown?

KB: They are going to get a hard working young man, somebody that wasn’t ever given anything and has had to work for everything. I’m used to working hard, I’m used to being the underdog, and I know I’m an underdog in this draft class. You are just going to get somebody that works hard and is willing to learn from the vets while also not conceding to the vets. I’m confident in my abilities, I’m going to work hard, I’ll be active in the community (I love helping others), so just a great person overall who is just ready to work and do whatever it takes to bring wins to your football team.