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Longtime Eagles OT Jason Peters on QB Carson Wentz Landing in Indy: ‘He’s going to get back to his MVP caliber’

Detroit Lions v Philadelphia Eagles Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images

According to longtime Philadelphia Eagles All-Pro left tackle Jason Peters, his former teammate, quarterback Carson Wentz, landed with an ideal new team, the Indianapolis Colts—reuniting with ex-Eagles offensive coordinator, now Colts head coach Frank Reich—who knows him very well:

“One thing I do know about Frank (Reich), he’s going to put Carson (Wentz) in the best position,” Peters said on SiriusXM NFL Radio. “He’s not going to let him just go out there and have bad mechanics or just go out there and throw bad balls. He’s going to put him in the best spots. He’s going to correct him when he’s wrong and vice versa.”

“They’re going to communicate with each other and all of that good stuff, so I think Frank is going to bring out the best of Carson because I’ve seen it (during) the Super Bowl run. Those two were great together, and that’s a good fit for Carson I think.”

“He’s going to get back to his MVP caliber.”

Both Reich and Wentz had a positive working relationship in 2017 with the Eagles, when Wentz was a bonafide NFL MVP candidate, throwing for 33 touchdowns to 7 interceptions for the then 11-2 Eagles before suffering a season-ending torn ACL injury.

Wentz has yet to regain his prior All-Pro form and saw his relationship deteriorate with dismissed Eagles head coach Doug Pederson, as there were leaked reports of Wentz’ lack of accountability and coachability—in addition to his dreadful 2020 production.

However, just as much of Wentz’ recent decline on the field is mental and some acquired bad habits regarding his passing mechanics.

Always an eternal optimist and chief motivator, Reich as a former NFL quarterback himself, may know what truly makes Wentz tick and can provide positive reinforcement and instill confidence in him—while still holding him accountable for his mistakes and lapses in proper mechanics using constructive criticism and feedback.

Reich will look to maximize Wentz’s strengths on the field, while mitigating his weaknesses.

The hope is that by rejoining Reich (and playing behind a strong Colts’ offensive line in a quarterback friendly offense), that Wentz, still only 28 years old, can rediscover his prior MVP caliber form and get back to being the young dynamic quarterback who once was so darn promising as the 2nd overall pick of the 2016 NFL Draft.

If you ask his former blindside blocking anchor, veteran Jason Peters, he will in Indianapolis.